Tag: biodiversity

Smoke, Black Cockatoos, and Banksias

Stirling Ranges, Western Australia (Source: Terri Anne Allen) By Jessica White In November 2019, before I flew to Munich, I stayed with my parents in Armidale, New South Wales. National parks, farms, and properties between the town and the coast were on fire and,… Continue Reading “Smoke, Black Cockatoos, and Banksias”

Overcoming the Fear Factor: Teaching and Learning about Insects and Biodiversity

Tony Weis is a geography professor whose research is broadly located in the field of political ecology, with a focus on agriculture and food systems. He is also a former fellow of the Rachel Carson Center where he worked on a project titled “Ghosts and… Continue Reading “Overcoming the Fear Factor: Teaching and Learning about Insects and Biodiversity”

In Conservative Bavaria, Citizens Force Bold Action on Protecting Nature

*This post was originally published on the Yale Environment 360 site in April 2019 and has been reproduced here with permission. The featured image shows activists gathering in Munich to show support for Bavaria’s biodiversity referendum in January 2019. Photo: Georg Kurz By Christian Schwägerl Christian Schwägerl… Continue Reading “In Conservative Bavaria, Citizens Force Bold Action on Protecting Nature”

Feeling Eco-Adventurous? An Interview with Author John Morano

  John Morano is a professor of journalism at Monmouth University in New Jersey. He has written four novels in his Eco-Adventure Series, as well as a textbook for film critics, Don’t Tell Me the Ending! He is currently working on his fifth novel, a… Continue Reading “Feeling Eco-Adventurous? An Interview with Author John Morano”

Make Meadows, Not Lawns

“The Heart of the Ecosystem: Taking Responsibility for the Extinction of Bees” By Rosamund Portus *Featured image: A roundabout in Mössingen, the “City of Flowers.” Photo: UnreifeKirsche [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons. When we think of extinction, we tend to think of a… Continue Reading “Make Meadows, Not Lawns”

The Bellflower Specialists

Read the first part of this post, Insect Profile: Chelostoma rapunculi. “Bees of Öland, Sweden: An Interview with Heidi Dobson” By Eunice Blavascunas and Alie J. Zagata Professor Heidi Dobson is a member of the Department of Biology at Whitman College. She spends her… Continue Reading “The Bellflower Specialists”

Fifty Years Ago, Cockchafers Belonged to Spring…

“The Cockchafer, Part 2” (In case you missed it, read part 1, Insect Profile: The Cockchafer here! By Birgit Müller and Susanne Schmitt We met Ernst-Gerhard Burmeister at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology where he has dedicated most of his professional life to the amazing collection of… Continue Reading “Fifty Years Ago, Cockchafers Belonged to Spring…”

Call for Submissions: Silent Spring Continued  

By Birgit Müller, Sainath Suryanarayanan, Katarzyna Beilin, Susanne Schmitt, Tony Weis, and Serenella Iovino The recent article by Hallmann and others about a more than 75 percent decline in the biomass of flying insects in Germany over the past 27 years has received considerable… Continue Reading “Call for Submissions: Silent Spring Continued  “

Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek

Guest Post by Kathleen Smythe Kathleen Smythe is a professor in the Department of History at Xavier University, Cincinnati. In this post, she offers a fascinating glimpse into the history of Mill Creek, engaging with the historical, social, economic, and ecological meanings behind the… Continue Reading “Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek”

Snapshot: Celebrating Urban Green

On European Day of Parks, the RCC is celebrating working right next door to one of Munich’s generous, wooded city parks—the Leopoldpark. Staff and students of the University can make the most of the view from the LMU’s canteen and cafeteria, which look directly out… Continue Reading “Snapshot: Celebrating Urban Green”