Seeing the Woods

A blog by the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

About This Blog

Seeing the Woods is produced by the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC), an international and interdisciplinary research center devoted to the environmental humanities. Its contributors include the RCC’s staff and fellows, as well as external contributors from this multi-disciplinary community.

The mission of the blog is to demonstrate the relevancy and importance of humanistic and historical perspectives in discussions about today’s environmental challenges. We seek to provide context that will help reveal the bigger picture, or “the woods,” explaining the long and complex relationship between humans and nature.

In doing so, Seeing the Woods showcases innovative research, valuable resources and provocative commentary from experts in fields such as history, eco-criticism, anthropology, and philosophy, to name a few.

Through this blog, the RCC also strives to connect scholarship and public discourse. We believe such connections are necessary for finding solutions to local and global environmental problems.

If you are interested in contributing to this blog, please read our submission guidelines or write to us at blog@carsoncenter.lmu.de.

About the RCC

The RCC is an international, interdisciplinary center for research and education in the environmental humanities located in Munich, Germany.  It is named after the American biologist, nature writer, and environmentalist Rachel Carson, whose accessible writing raised awareness worldwide about threats to the environment and human health.

The RCC’s mission is to advance research and discussion concerning the interaction between humans and nature, and to strengthen the role of the humanities in current political and scientific debates about the environment.

Visit our homepage to learn more about what we do. 

About the Design

The blog header was designed by Marielle Dado (former editor, RCC), who also edited the theme. The photo in the header is courtesy of Elliott Bennett (potzuyoko) via Flickr.

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