Tag: environmental history

The Taproom: Shen Hou

“German Beer and the Making of a New China” By Shen Hou The first commercial filmed in China was a 1947 effort to sell Tsingtao Beer, one of the world’s most famous brands. “Tsingtao” is an older spelling of the name “Qingdao,” the city…

Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek

Guest Post by Kathleen Smythe Kathleen Smythe is a professor in the Department of History at Xavier University, Cincinnati. In this post, she offers a fascinating glimpse into the history of Mill Creek, engaging with the historical, social, economic, and ecological meanings behind the…

Making Tracks: Teresa Spezio

In the “Making Tracks” series, RCC fellows and alumni present their experiences in environmental humanities, retracing the paths that led them to the Rachel Carson Center. For more information, please click here. by Teresa Spezio As a child, I had first-hand experience with air and…

The Taproom: Robert Terrell

“The Reinheitsgebot: Between German Consumer Culture and the European Market” By Robert Terrell On 15 July, 1987, West German federal president Richard von Weizsäcker received a letter from one Andreas Z., which began: “Much has been written about the Reinheitsgebot lately.” Indeed, recent press…

Review of “Disrupted Landscapes: State, Peasants and the Politics of Land in Postsocialist Romania” by Stefan Dorondel

by Marco Armiero Marco Armiero is director of the KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. This post originally appeared on Entitle Blog – A Collaborative Writing Project on Political Ecology and is reposted with kind permission of the author. How…

Hazardous Time-Scapes: How to Make Sense of Toxic Landscapes from Multiple Timed, Spaced, and Embodied Perspectives?

Workshop Report (30 November–12 December 2017, Rachel Carson Center, Munich, Germany) by Laura Deal (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster) How do we understand toxic environments? What roles do time, space, narration, and embodiment play in our conceptualizations of what it is for something to be considered “toxic”?…

Bookshelf Special Feature Part 2: National Park Science

A Review of National Park Science: Jane Carruthers’ Magnum Opus  by Bernhard Gißibl * Part 1 features Jane Carruthers’ introduction to her book and a comment by Libby Robin. A full review of National Park Science by Bernhard Gißibl will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Environment…

Making Tracks: Gregg Mitman

In the “Making Tracks” series, RCC fellows and alumni present their experiences in environmental humanities, retracing the paths that led them to the Rachel Carson Center. For more information, please click here. By Gregg Mitman My journey to the Rachel Carson Center began in 1967…

Doktorandentag 2017!

Eight new members of the RCC’s doctoral program and two visiting doctoral students presented their projects at the center’s annual “Doktorandentag.” Organized and moderated by members of the program, the format allowed each student to present a *snapshot* of their research followed by a…

The Taproom

“Everyone’s Favorite Topic: Beer and the Rest of the World” By Pavla Šimková When I started doing research in beer history, I had no idea what I was getting into. I doubt there is a beer pun in the world I haven’t heard yet. People…