Tag: agriculture

Insect Portrait: The Dung Beetle

By Olea Morris The family of insects known as “dung beetle,” or escarabajos del estiercol, is a diverse one—even amongst those that make the same misty cloud forests of Mexico their home. Some, like Onthophagus corrosus, are jet black and no bigger than the… Continue Reading “Insect Portrait: The Dung Beetle”

Portrait of an Insect Lover: Alexandra Magro

This piece was written by Birgit Müller, anthropologist and curator of the series “Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects,” based on an interview with Alexandra Magro, an evolutionary ecologist working on, among other things, the life strategies of ladybird beetles. By Birgit Müller… Continue Reading “Portrait of an Insect Lover: Alexandra Magro”

Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles

*Image: ©Alexandra Magro Ladybird beetles (of the family Coccinellidae) are a fascinating group of insects. Thriving in all kinds of habitats, they are extremely diverse; around 6,000 species have been described worldwide. Although they are often recognized as beneficial predatory insectivores, their food preferences… Continue Reading “Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles”

Changing Landscapes of Indigeneity: CHE Place-Based Workshop

Workshop Report (13–16 May 2019, Madison–Wisconsin, USA) Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Center for Culture, History, and Environment By Daniel Dumas  In May 2019, a group of staff, doctoral candidates, and Environmental Studies Certificate Program students from the Rachel Carson Center… Continue Reading “Changing Landscapes of Indigeneity: CHE Place-Based Workshop”

Picking Hops in Nineteenth-Century Wisconsin

The Taproom is a monthly series that explores the rich history of all things beer. It is curated by Pavla Šimková. *Feature image: Group of men, women, and children gathered in a hop field, possibly that of Paul Saavles. Image ID 26259, 1874, by Andreas Larsen… Continue Reading “Picking Hops in Nineteenth-Century Wisconsin”

Making Tracks: Environmental Histories of the Brazilian Cerrado

By Claiton Marcio da Silva The Brazilian Cerrado made me an environmental historian. My interest in the agricultural transformations in Brazilian savannas—a biome located in the central part of Brazil that extends over an area of approximately 2.000.000 km²—started when I left the southern and subtropical regions of the country to seek employment in the mythical Brazilian backwoods.

The Bellflower Specialists

Read the first part of this post, Insect Profile: Chelostoma rapunculi. “Bees of Öland, Sweden: An Interview with Heidi Dobson” By Eunice Blavascunas and Alie J. Zagata Professor Heidi Dobson is a member of the Department of Biology at Whitman College. She spends her… Continue Reading “The Bellflower Specialists”

For a Dignified Life

Hazardous Hope Part 1 “Remediation Practices in Ecuador” by Maximilian Feichtner (*Featured image © Theresa Leisgang) Like a tiny mushroom, hope is growing in the once-lush rain forest of the Amazon in northeastern Ecuador: bioremediation as a solution to the extensive environmental contamination. It is… Continue Reading “For a Dignified Life”

Making Tracks: Unsettling Landscapes and Imaginations

By Tony Weis I come from the settler-colonial nation of Canada, in a part of southwestern Ontario that sits upon the traditional territories of the Attawandaron, Anishnaabee, Haudenosaunee, and Leni-Lunaape Peoples. Today, nine First Nations reserves together control just over one percent of all land in southwestern Ontario. The landscape must have been beautiful, and still is in small patches, especially along river valleys and lake shores.

Welcome to the Taproom

“Everyone’s Favorite Topic: Beer and the Rest of the World” By Pavla Šimková When I started doing research in beer history, I had no idea what I was getting into. I doubt there is a beer pun in the world I haven’t heard yet. People… Continue Reading “Welcome to the Taproom”