Category: Series

Making Tracks: Charlie Trautmann

“Home at Last” By Charlie Trautmann Have you ever received a paperback for Christmas from your mother-in-law that landed you a fellowship at the Rachel Carson Center in Munich? I have. My journey to the Carson Center was more like an odyssey—long and circuitous….

The Taproom: Shen Hou

“German Beer and the Making of a New China” By Shen Hou The first commercial filmed in China was a 1947 effort to sell Tsingtao Beer, one of the world’s most famous brands. “Tsingtao” is an older spelling of the name “Qingdao,” the city…

Making Tracks: Chris Cokinos

“Finding How to Say It” by Chris Cokinos Intention is a funny thing, especially when it comes to creative work. Intention can become something forced; it can become an attachment to outcome at the expense of actually giving into the work itself. There’s a…

Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek

Guest Post by Kathleen Smythe Kathleen Smythe is a professor in the Department of History at Xavier University, Cincinnati. In this post, she offers a fascinating glimpse into the history of Mill Creek, engaging with the historical, social, economic, and ecological meanings behind the…

From Herders to Hikers, the Shifting Lives of Scottish Bothies

This piece was originally published by Edge Effects and is reposted here with kind permission. All photographs are courtesy of the author. By Jonas Stuck When I was 20 years old, I heard about huts in northern England and Scotland called bothies. I didn’t even…

Making Tracks: Teresa Spezio

In the “Making Tracks” series, RCC fellows and alumni present their experiences in environmental humanities, retracing the paths that led them to the Rachel Carson Center. For more information, please click here. by Teresa Spezio As a child, I had first-hand experience with air and…

The Taproom: Richard W. Unger

“The Brewing Boom of the Middle Ages” By Richard W. Unger Until 1200, beer brewing in Europe was largely a small-scale affair. Hops soon changed that. Based on practices in Bremen and other ports along the North Sea coast of Germany, a seemingly minor…

Q&A with Jessica J. Lee

For this Bookshelf post, we asked author and RCC alumna Jessica J. Lee a few questions about her work and her 2017 book, Turning: A Swimming Memoir. What is the subject of your book and how did it come about? Turning is a hybrid…

The Taproom: Robert Terrell

“The Reinheitsgebot: Between German Consumer Culture and the European Market” By Robert Terrell On 15 July, 1987, West German federal president Richard von Weizsäcker received a letter from one Andreas Z., which began: “Much has been written about the Reinheitsgebot lately.” Indeed, recent press…

Saturday Morning’s Politics of Seeing

Nancy Jacobs, Professor of History at Brown University, Rhode Island (USA), provides a rich and personal account of practicing interdisciplinary research. On a field trip to uncover knowledge and beliefs about the African grey parrot in Cameroon, Nancy worked together with her brother (an experienced birder) and her field assistant (an ornithologist), gaining deep insights not only into science and culture, but particularly the behavior of birds and birdwatchers.