Category: Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects?

Tracing Landscape Change through Dung Beetles

As part of the ongoing series Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects, environmental anthropolgist Olea Morris recounts how fieldwork in Mexico introduced her to the world of dung beetles. This post follows on from Olea’s Insect Profile on dung beetles. *Featured Image: Dung… Continue Reading “Tracing Landscape Change through Dung Beetles”

Insect Portrait: The Dung Beetle

By Olea Morris The family of insects known as “dung beetle,” or escarabajos del estiercol, is a diverse one—even amongst those that make the same misty cloud forests of Mexico their home. Some, like Onthophagus corrosus, are jet black and no bigger than the… Continue Reading “Insect Portrait: The Dung Beetle”

Mosquitopia? Could We or Should We Eradicate Mosquitos: A Short Film

In this short film created by the Mosquitopia team following the Rachel Carson Legacy Symposium “Mosquitopia? The Place of Pests in a Healthy World,” 21 experts give their opinions and insights on this critical question. For more on the topic, check out the symposium… Continue Reading “Mosquitopia? Could We or Should We Eradicate Mosquitos: A Short Film”

Portrait of an Insect Lover: Alexandra Magro

This piece was written by Birgit Müller, anthropologist and curator of the series “Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects,” based on an interview with Alexandra Magro, an evolutionary ecologist working on, among other things, the life strategies of ladybird beetles. By Birgit Müller… Continue Reading “Portrait of an Insect Lover: Alexandra Magro”

Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles

*Image: ©Alexandra Magro Ladybird beetles (of the family Coccinellidae) are a fascinating group of insects. Thriving in all kinds of habitats, they are extremely diverse; around 6,000 species have been described worldwide. Although they are often recognized as beneficial predatory insectivores, their food preferences… Continue Reading “Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles”

Insects as Inspiration

As part of the series “Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects,” guest author Jan Goedbloed shares with us how he developed a deep interest in invertebrates and reflects on how insects continue to inspire him in life, work, and beyond. *Featured image: Chaoborus… Continue Reading “Insects as Inspiration”

Overcoming the Fear Factor: Teaching and Learning about Insects and Biodiversity

Tony Weis is a geography professor whose research is broadly located in the field of political ecology, with a focus on agriculture and food systems. He is also a former fellow of the Rachel Carson Center where he worked on a project titled “Ghosts and… Continue Reading “Overcoming the Fear Factor: Teaching and Learning about Insects and Biodiversity”

Mosquitopia Part 3: Key Reasons for Killing Mosquitoes

In this final installment of the special feature on mosquitoes, the authors present some major arguments for implementing strategies to eradicate mosquitoes. The feature coincides with the Rachel Carson Legacy Symposium “Mosquitopia? The Place of Pests in a Healthy World” being held this weekend… Continue Reading “Mosquitopia Part 3: Key Reasons for Killing Mosquitoes”

Mosquitopia Part 2: A few Reasons for Saving Mosquitoes

This is the second installment on mosquitoes to coincide with the Rachel Carson Legacy Symposium “Mosquitopia? The Place of Pests in a Healthy World” being held this weekend (24–27 October 2019). Here, the authors summarize some of the main arguments against trying to rid… Continue Reading “Mosquitopia Part 2: A few Reasons for Saving Mosquitoes”

Mosquitopia Part 1: Killing Mosquitoes? The Pros and Cons

In the first of this three-part installment, Marcus Hall and Dan Tamir introduce us to the possibility of eradicating mosquitoes from the globe. Experts are asking whether it is indeed possible, advisable, and/or ethical, to pursue such a path. To stimulate further dialogue and… Continue Reading “Mosquitopia Part 1: Killing Mosquitoes? The Pros and Cons”