Seeing the Woods

A blog by the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society


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CfA: RCC Fellowships 2018–2019

RCC staff and fellows

The Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society invites applications for its 2018–19 cohort of postdoctoral and senior fellows. The RCC’s fellowship program is designed to bring together excellent scholars who are working in environmental history and related disciplines.

The center will award fellowships to scholars from a variety of countries and disciplines. Applicants’ research and writing should pertain to the central theme of the RCC—transformations in environment and society. Research at the RCC is concerned with questions of the interrelationship between environmental and social changes, and in particular the reasons—social, political, cultural, and environmental factors—for these transformations.

The RCC awards four types of fellowships:

  • Carson Writing Fellowships
  • Interdisciplinary Writing Fellowships
  • Outreach Fellowships
  • Short-Term Fellowships

All fellows are expected to spend their fellowship in residence, to work on a major project, to participate actively in life at the RCC, to attend the weekly lunchtime colloquium, and to present their project at the center. Please note that the RCC does not sponsor field trips or archival research for any of the fellowship types.

Carson Writing Fellowships
These fellowships are at the center of our fellowship program and are awarded to scholars aiming to complete several major articles or a book project in the environmental humanities.

Interdisciplinary Writing Fellowships
To promote cooperation across disciplinary boundaries, we invite applications for interdisciplinary writing fellowships. Scholars from the humanities are invited to apply jointly with scholars from the sciences or field practitioners with the purpose of authoring a collaborative project. These fellowships are only intended for writing.

Applicants for interdisciplinary writing fellowships must apply together from at least two separate institutions or organizations. It would be advantageous if one of these institutions is LMU Munich or another Munich-based organization. Please note that funding will only be awarded to the non-Munich partners. All members of the collaboration should plan to be in residence in Munich at the same time. If applying with a LMU scholar, please include a letter of support from this scholar.

Outreach Fellowships
Outreach fellowships are intended for candidates whose work promotes public engagement with the topic of transformations in environment and society. We invite applications from documentary filmmakers and writers in particular.

Short-term Fellowships
Short-term fellowships (up to 3 months) are designed to encourage genuinely explorative partnerships and dialogue across disciplinary divides and between theory and practice. Scholars on short-term fellowships come to Munich to develop a specific project—for example, a joint publication, a workshop, or other collaborative research projects.

To Apply:
All successful applicants should plan to begin their fellowship between 1 September 2018 and 1 December 2019; it will not be possible to start a fellowship awarded in this round at a later date. Decisions about the fellowships will be announced in mid-May 2018. Fellowships will usually be granted for periods of 3, 6, 9, or 12 months; short-term fellowships are granted for 1 to 2 months. The RCC will pay for a teaching replacement of the successful candidate at his or her home institution; alternatively, it will pay a stipend that is commensurate with experience and current employment and which also conforms to funding guidelines.

The deadline for applications is 31 January 2018. Applications must be made in our online portal. The application portal will be open from 1 January to 31 January 2018. It closes at midnight (Central European Time) on 31 January.

Candidates are welcome to apply for more than one type of fellowship. In such cases, the candidate should submit a new application for each fellowship type. If successful, the candidate will only be awarded one fellowship.

The application should discuss the RCC’s core research theme “transformations in environment and society” in the project description or the cover letter and should include the following:

• Cover letter (750 words maximum)
• Curriculum vitae (3 pages maximum)
• Project description (1,000 words maximum)
• Research schedule for the fellowship period (300 words maximum)
• Names and contact information of three scholars as referees; these scholars should be people who know you and your work well. Please note that we do not initially require letters, and we may not contact your referees.

Please note that in order to be eligible for all fellowships except the outreach fellowships, you must have completed your doctorate by the application deadline (31 January 2018). Scholars already based in the greater Munich area are not eligible.

You may write your application in either English or German; please use the language in which you are most proficient. You will be notified about the outcome of your application by mid-May 2018.

For more information, please visit the Fellowship Applications – Frequently Asked Questions section of our website. Please consult this section before contacting us with questions.

You can download this call here.


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Call for Papers: The Environmental History of the Pacific World

Conference – Sun Yat Sen University, Guangzhou, China

24 May – 26 May 2018

Location: Sun Yat Sen University, Guangzhou, China

Sponsors: The Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich; Department of History and The Center for Oceania Studies, Sun Yat Sen University, Guangzhou; The Center for Ecological History, Renmin University of China, Beijing.

pacific world

The Pacific Ocean is the ancient outcome of plate tectonic movement, creating one of the largest eco-regions on earth. Although navigators explored those waters early on, and peoples spread to all the ocean’s shores and penetrated as far into the center as the Hawaiian archipelago, it was not until the 16th century that the great body of water was discovered as a whole and mapped at a global scale. Since then, the Pacific has become a place of increasing human-nature interaction—through international trade, warfare, cultural interchange, and extraction of resources. Our conference aims to bring this ocean more fully into the discourse of environmental historians.

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Call for Candidates: Doctoral Program Environment and Society

You can download the pdf of this call here.

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The Doctoral Program in Environment and Society invites applications from graduates in
the humanities and social sciences who wish to research the complex relationships between environment and society within an interdisciplinary setting. Our program is based at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC), a joint initiative of LMU Munich and the Deutsches Museum. The RCC is an international center for research and education in the environmental humanities and social sciences: its mission is to advance research and discussion concerning the interrelationship between humans and nature.

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The Taproom

Everyone’s Favorite Topic: Beer and the Rest of the World”

By Pavla Šimková

beer-a-pint-cup-alcohol-65210When I started doing research in beer history, I had no idea what I was getting into.

I doubt there is a beer pun in the world I haven’t heard yet. People have wished me hoppy holidays. They can barley contain their excitement about interesting beer articles they have just read. They collapse in fits of laughter when talking about the first draft of my project.

I have gotten used to people treating my research as something of a joke, a topic growing out of a personal fondness for the malt beverage. Mostly I play along: When I go to a pub, I’m conducting empirical research. When my pint arrives, I sniff and swirl the glass as if it were Château Lafite and pontificate about strong hoppy-citrus flavors and dark malts with just a touch of smoke. (My friend Malcolm can actually do this—wait until you read his contribution to this blog!) Continue reading


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Day 3. Danube Excursion: Passau—Linz

by Lea Wiser


Passau → Linz


Our third day on the Danube excursion was both eventful and thought provoking, packed with activities covering a broad range of subjects: from environment and sustainability to modern history and the Nazi regime, to where these two subjects intersect—the city of Linz.

Jochenstein

Our first stops, the Donaukraftwerk in Jochenstein and Haus am Strom in Untergriesbach, were already familiar to us, but during this visit we were able to admire the views from the other side of the Danube. On the way, we passed the Schlögener Schlinge, a meandering part of the river that created a loess-rich agricultural land below the steep slopes of the Bohemian Massif.

jochenstein bridge

Hydropower plant Jochenstein. The German-Austrian border runs through the center of the structure.

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Day 2. Danube Excursion: Deggendorf—Passau

Written by Leon Gomoll


Deggendorf → Vilshofen → Jochenstein → Passau


Bridge-Building and Nature Conservation on the Donau

Early Modern Bridges and Politics in Bavaria

On the second day of our field trip, we learned about Early Modern bridge-building in Bavaria. Martin Keßler’s talk focused on the politics of bridges, using as an example the bridge of Vilshofen, a small town near Passau. In the Middle Ages, Passau was an autonomous bishopric, independent from the duchy of Bavaria and archbishopric of Salzburg. It maintained its autonomy from Bavaria until 1802. Early Modern Bavaria included the lands between the rivers Lech to the west, the Danube to the north, and the Inn to the east. Within the territory of Bavaria there were many other stand-alone territories, for example imperial free cities like Augsburg and Nuremberg.

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The History of Munich and Its Loam

„Ohne den Lehm daat’s München net geb‘n!“

This post by Julia Schneider, a student of the RCC-LMU Environmental Studies Certificate Program, stems from her research conducted as part of the exhibition project “Ecopolis: Understanding and Imagining Munich’s Environments.”


bricks

Figure 1. Details of clay bricks in Munich, from the Nordfriedhof (left), the Frauenkirche (center), and the Salvatorkirche (right). Photographs by author.

Thinking about houses and buildings made out of clay bricks, it is often cities like those in northern Italy that spring to mind. Bologna, Florence, or Siena; particularly those moments when the sun sets and the city glows red and ochre with all the big churches, towers, and palazzi made out of and covered with red clay bricks and tiles. Clay bricks are Italy. Thus, such an image doesn’t really fit with Munich, our Bavarian capital north of the Alps, quite far away from Bella Italia and its red sun—at least that’s what I thought before writing this article. Continue reading