Tag: photography

Capturing the Environment

“Visualizing the Environment: Environmental Photography Workshop” By Sasha L. Gora This very blog is framed around the idea of seeing the woods, but what about photographing the woods? The common expression,“Can’t see the wood (or forest) for the trees,” communicates the sense of not…

From Herders to Hikers, the Shifting Lives of Scottish Bothies

This piece was originally published by Edge Effects and is reposted here with kind permission. All photographs are courtesy of the author. By Jonas Stuck When I was 20 years old, I heard about huts in northern England and Scotland called bothies. I didn’t even…

Snapshot: The Lookout

By Jonas Stuck When I first reached the Lookout, I was blown away by the spectacular plunging cliffs and the magnificent views across the sea and the Outer Hebrides. But I hardly had any time to enjoy the sunset—a storm was about to hit northern…

Saturday Morning’s Politics of Seeing

Nancy Jacobs, Professor of History at Brown University, Rhode Island (USA), provides a rich and personal account of practicing interdisciplinary research. On a field trip to uncover knowledge and beliefs about the African grey parrot in Cameroon, Nancy worked together with her brother (an experienced birder) and her field assistant (an ornithologist), gaining deep insights not only into science and culture, but particularly the behavior of birds and birdwatchers.

Day 1. The Danube Excursion: Munich—Deggendorf

Written by David Stäblein Munich —> Winzer —> Mühlham —> Deggendorf The bus ride from Munich to Deggendorf along the Isar river The landscape en route from Munich to Deggendorf is dominated by the flat valley of the river Isar. The river has carried…

Danube: Environments, Histories, and Cultures

A Place-Based Workshop 4–11 June 2017 Winding through Central and Eastern Europe, the once longstanding frontier of the Roman empire, the Danube, has carved its way into the landscapes and cultures of the countries it traverses. But the marks of humans, imprints of the…

Transitions in Energy Landscapes and Everyday Life in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

27–29 April 2017, Munich, Germany A report on the workshop sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK), Rachel Carson Center, and the Deutsches Museum (Germany), convened by Heather Chappells (University of British Columbia), Vanessa Taylor (University of Greenwich), Frank Trentmann (Birkbeck College), Helmuth…

Snapshot: Human Evolution Workshop

By Christian Schnurr The evolution of the genus Homo was influenced in part by the landscape in which early hominins lived. Important archaeological sites are often located in areas with very rough terrain and a rich supply of nutrients and trace elements. These two features…

The Future of Wild Europe

Conference Report (The University of Leeds, UK, 12–14 September 2016) By Roger Norum A version of this report was first published  17 October 2016 on ENHANCE ITN. This three-day conference was the first of three large events for the ENHANCE ITN (The Environmental Humanities for a Concerned…

Worldview: Antarctica

by Ingo Heidbrink Antarctica is the only continent with a permanent population of zero, and it has a strong international regulation system governing human activities from research to tourism. One might question whether an environmental history of Antarctica, beyond natural history, could therefore even…

Photo of the Week: Anna Rühl

With over 250 days of sunshine a year, Mongolians call their country the Land of the Blue Sky. Except sometimes it’s not. On a winter’s day in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar—home to approximately half of the country’s population of three million—air pollution can…