Tag: ecology

Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles

*Image: ©Alexandra Magro Ladybird beetles (of the family Coccinellidae) are a fascinating group of insects. Thriving in all kinds of habitats, they are extremely diverse; around 6,000 species have been described worldwide. Although they are often recognized as beneficial predatory insectivores, their food preferences… Continue Reading “Insect Portrait: Ladybird Beetles”

Ecopolis Munich: Environmental Stories of Discovery

The student exhibition “Ecopolis Munich: Environmental Stories of Discovery” sheds light on the relationship between Munich’s residents and their urban environment. The exhibition was on display from 12 to 20 October 2019 at the whiteBOX in the Werksviertel Mitte. The practical seminar leading to… Continue Reading “Ecopolis Munich: Environmental Stories of Discovery”

Insects as Inspiration

As part of the series “Silent Spring Continued: A World without Insects,” guest author Jan Goedbloed shares with us how he developed a deep interest in invertebrates and reflects on how insects continue to inspire him in life, work, and beyond. *Featured image: Chaoborus… Continue Reading “Insects as Inspiration”

Snapshot: Ecocritics Welcome Here!

On 15 February, the RCC played host to a poster exhibition on ecocriticism. Master’s-level students working with Dr Felicitas Meifert-Menhard from LMU Munich’s English department had spent a semester learning about the wide reach and application of reading literary texts ecologically—not just contemporary texts… Continue Reading “Snapshot: Ecocritics Welcome Here!”

Making Tracks: Birgit Schneider

In the “Making Tracks” series, RCC fellows and alumni present their experiences in environmental humanities, retracing the paths that led them to the Rachel Carson Center. For more information, please click here. By Birgit Schneider I have been interested in representations with a focus on… Continue Reading “Making Tracks: Birgit Schneider”

Where Have All the Insects Gone?

For many of us, engaging with insects doesn’t extend much beyond swatting away flies and mosquitoes, or calling on bigger and braver friends to deposit unwanted “visitors” outside. And yet, as E.O. Wilson observed, it is we who are the visitors in “a primarily… Continue Reading “Where Have All the Insects Gone?”

Call for Submissions: Silent Spring Continued  

By Birgit Müller, Sainath Suryanarayanan, Katarzyna Beilin, Susanne Schmitt, Tony Weis, and Serenella Iovino The recent article by Hallmann and others about a more than 75 percent decline in the biomass of flying insects in Germany over the past 27 years has received considerable… Continue Reading “Call for Submissions: Silent Spring Continued  “

Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek

Guest Post by Kathleen Smythe Kathleen Smythe is a professor in the Department of History at Xavier University, Cincinnati. In this post, she offers a fascinating glimpse into the history of Mill Creek, engaging with the historical, social, economic, and ecological meanings behind the… Continue Reading “Path Dependency: Layers of History along the Mill Creek”

LUNCHTIME COLLOQUIA, WINTER SEMESTER 2017/2018

Climate politics, posthumanism, planetary health, ecofeminism, and much more during the 2017/2018 winter semester at the Rachel Carson Center. Would you like to keep up to date with our latest Lunchtime Colloquia? Then follow us by subscribing to our Rachel Carson Center Youtube Channel for new… Continue Reading “LUNCHTIME COLLOQUIA, WINTER SEMESTER 2017/2018”

Bookshelf Special Feature Part 2: National Park Science

A Review of National Park Science: Jane Carruthers’ Magnum Opus  by Bernhard Gißibl * Part 1 features Jane Carruthers’ introduction to her book and a comment by Libby Robin. A full review of National Park Science by Bernhard Gißibl will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Environment… Continue Reading “Bookshelf Special Feature Part 2: National Park Science”