Tag: climate science

Beyond Denial and Anger: How Journalists and Scientists can Collaborate for Better Communication

By: Rosalind Margaret Donald In the early months of 1999, the UK press traded headlines for and against the use of genetically modified crops. A circulation war had escalated to ecstatic heights, peaking in February with the Daily Express’s headline “MUTANT CROPS COULD KILL YOU.”… Continue Reading “Beyond Denial and Anger: How Journalists and Scientists can Collaborate for Better Communication”

Green Talks: Barbro Soller and the Emergence of Modern Environmentalism in 1960s Sweden

*Featured image: The modern villa family, on the front page of the Dagens Nyheter newspaper, 4 November 1968. ©Dagens Nyheters digital archive, used with kind permission. By David Larsson Heidenblad The historiography of modern environmentalism revolves around scientists, intellectuals, activists, and politicians. Hence, we know much… Continue Reading “Green Talks: Barbro Soller and the Emergence of Modern Environmentalism in 1960s Sweden”

Green Talks: Looking Behind the Scenes of Environmental Journalism

In this new series edited by Maximilian Feichtner, Jonas Stuck, and Ayushi Dhawan of the DFG Emmy-Noether Research Group Hazardous Travels. Ghost Acres and the Global Waste Economy, the authors take a look into the role of environmental journalism in communicating science and spurring… Continue Reading “Green Talks: Looking Behind the Scenes of Environmental Journalism”

Making Tracks: Birgit Schneider

By Birgit Schneider I have been interested in representations with a focus on visuality for a very long time. In fact, it wasn’t my early childhood experiences with the outdoors that led to my interest in environmental issues in the first place, but rather my mediated experiences with nature. Like most others, I frequently encounter current environmental issues as they are presented to me through various media—in nature movies or documentaries, weather reports, maps, and even apps—making these mediated experiences even more likely than unmediated ones.

Making Tracks: Lynda Walsh

By Lynda Walsh I’m not 100 percent positive, but I believe I may be the first rhetorician who has been a fellow at the Rachel Carson Center. This impression was corroborated by the confused squints that frequently greeted me when I introduced myself in the corridors or at a Works-in-Progress meeting: “Rhetoric?” my new colleagues would echo, and their undulating eyebrows added: “What’s that? And what’s it got to do with the environment?”