Category: Bookshelf

Q&A with Jessica J. Lee

For this Bookshelf post, we asked author and RCC alumna Jessica J. Lee a few questions about her work and her 2017 book, Turning: A Swimming Memoir. What is the subject of your book and how did it come about? Turning is a hybrid…

Review of “Disrupted Landscapes: State, Peasants and the Politics of Land in Postsocialist Romania” by Stefan Dorondel

by Marco Armiero Marco Armiero is director of the KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. This post originally appeared on Entitle Blog – A Collaborative Writing Project on Political Ecology and is reposted with kind permission of the author. How…

Bookshelf Special Feature Part 2: National Park Science

A Review of National Park Science: Jane Carruthers’ Magnum Opus  by Bernhard Gißibl * Part 1 features Jane Carruthers’ introduction to her book and a comment by Libby Robin. A full review of National Park Science by Bernhard Gißibl will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Environment…

Bookshelf Special Feature Part 1: National Park Science by Jane Carruthers

We were delighted to welcome Jane Carruthers back to the Rachel Carson Center this autumn. Jane has a longstanding relationship with the RCC; she served on its advisory board for six years, the latter three as its chair, and was a great influence on…

Paradigm Shifts in Environmental Thinking: Autonomous Nature by Carolyn Merchant

by Yan Gao Carolyn Merchant’s book Autonomous Nature traces paradigmatic shifts in environmental thinking from a long-term perspective. Derived from her ever-enduring interest in and perpetual investigations of chaos and complexity theories, Merchant probes into the roots and evolution of the terms natura naturans…

Toward a Beautiful Rural Life

by Zhen Wang Jenny Chio’s book A Landscape of Travel: The Work of Tourism in Rural Ethnic China attracted me because of its connection to my current research project at the Rachel Carson Center. One of the reasons for this is that we share…

Bookshelf: The Troubled History of Environmentalism

By Bob Wilson   The Genius of Earth Day: How a 1970 Teach-In Unexpectedly Made the First Green Generation by Adam Rome The Light-Green Society: Ecology and Technological Modernity in France, 1960-2000 by Michael Bess Seeing Green: The Use and Abuse of American Environmental…

Bookshelf: “What Would Animals Say If We Asked the Right Questions?” by Vinciane Despret, translated by Brett Buchanan

In this special “Bookshelf” post for Women in Translation month, RCC fellow Amanda Boetzkes reflects on Vinciane Despret’s recently published What Would Animals Say If We Asked the Right Questions? I cannot think of a more appropriate author to consider during Women in Translation…

Bookshelf: “Rule of Experts: Egypt, Techno-Politics, Modernity” by Timothy Mitchell

By Arnab Dey Tim Mitchell’s Rule of Experts has remained with me a long time, and continues to be an inspiration for my work and thinking. Focused on twentieth-century Egypt, Mitchell raises foundational questions about the purported globality of themes such as capitalism, technology,…

Bookshelf: “Empire of Cotton” by Sven Beckert

By Ernst Langthaler Among the books that have recently widened and deepened my historical knowledge the most is Sven Beckert’s Empire of Cotton. Drawing on a broad base of research in numerous archives and on a wealth of literature, the author follows the traces…

Bookshelf: Jens Kersten on Inwastement—Abfall in Umwelt und Gesellschaft

The Inwastement volume arose from the research cluster “Waste and Society” of the RCC together with LMU’s Center for Advanced Studies. Published in German by Transcript, the issue includes contributions from: Soraya Heuss-Aßbichler, Claudia R. Binder, Eveline Dürr, Gisela Grupe, Rüdiger Haum, Michael Jedelhauser, Jens Kersten, Roman…

“Nature, Red in Tooth and Claw”: Jiang Rong’s “Wolf Totem”

Post by Brenda Black Jiang Rong’s autobiographical novel Wolf Totem was one of the group reads for the Global Environment Summer Academy held at the Rachel Carson Center last August. It recounts the experiences of a Chinese college student, Chen Zhen (the author’s alter…